Friday, November 09, 2007

Idiots look at Data, Part V: Internal standards

In Part IV, we tried to grade the baselines. In Part V, we start looking at regions of interest, beginning with the Internal standard. The idea is to count things that look like they might be possible problems, namely:

  • shoulders on a peak of interest
  • leading or trailing edge on a peak of interest.
  • connection to neighbor above apparent baseline.
  • neighbor within one peak width
As before, click on an image for bigger. For the most part, these are scaled 2x as wide as tall.

[MORE]

ucla: Think the last one is the IS (if any). Shoulders 2, edges 0, connect 0, neighbors 0.



ex92: Umm, shoulders 2, edges 0, connect 2, neighbors 3




ex88: shoulders 2, edges 0, connect 2, neighbors 3





ex90: shoulders 2, edges 0, connect 2, neighbors 2




ex86: shoulders 2, edges 0, connect 2, neighbors 2






usada173: shoulders 2, edges 0, connect 0, neighbors 2



usada349: shoulders 1, edges 0, connect 1, neighbors 2



ex87: shoulders 1, edges 0, connect 1, neighbors 1



ex84: shoulders 1, edges 0, connect 2, neighbors 2



ex93: shoulders 1, edges 1, connect 0, neighbors 0



ex85: shoulders 1, edges 1, connect 0, neighbors 1



ex89: shoulders 1, edges 1, connect 1, neighbors 2



s3a: No IS apparent



s3b: No IS apparent.



Assesment


Test
shoulders
leading
or
trailing
edge
connect
above
baseline
neighbors
within

one

peak

total
UCLA
2
0
0
0
2
Ex 92 3-Jul
2
0
2
3
7
Ex 88 13-Jul
2
0
2
3
7
Ex 90 14-Jul
2
0
2
2
6
Ex 86
2
0
2
2
6
USADA 173 20-Jul
2
0
0
2
4
USADA 349 20-Jul
1
0
1
2
4
Ex 87 22-Jul
1
0
1
1
3
Ex 84 23-Jul
1
0
2
2
5
Ex 93 control
1
1
0
0
2
Ex 85 control
1
1
0
1
3
Ex 89 control
1
1
1
1
4
Shackleton top
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Shackleton bottom
n/a
n/.a
n/a
n/a
n/a

2 comments:

Larry said...

um ... I don't mean to complain, but THIS set of graphs makes me feel like I'm watching a cinescope movie from the first row.

I understand why you might want to focus on the portion of the graph between any internal standards (though I've been arguing with M that you should look at the pattern of noise across the entire spectrum), but I think it would be clearer to use the Part IV graphs and mark the internal standards with a yellow highlighter.

And if it's not too much trouble, maybe you could identify where on each graph you're finding shoulders, edges, etc. The importance of doing this identification depends on what you're ultimately trying to prove here ... but the identification of a shoulder or an edge is somewhat subjective, so it would be good to see what you've identified and if we "idiots" agree with your identifications.

tbv@trustbut.com said...

Larry,

I'm not going into that level of detail for reasons that will become clear later.

TBV